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Taiwan: Legislation and Practice on Choice of Court Agreements in Taiwan

  • Rong-Chwan ChenEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Ius Comparatum - Global Studies in Comparative Law book series (GSCL, volume 37)

Abstract

The effectiveness of jurisdictional agreements was envisaged and recognized in the Taiwanese Code of Civil Procedure. Its provisions apply to both optional and exclusive choice of court agreements, despite the fact that they are basically designed for the latter. This chapter addresses the legislative development and judicial practice on such agreements. Section 1 explores the legislation on jurisdictional agreements with emphasis on their limitative requirements and adjustment to cope with modern communications technology. Section 2 focuses on judicial practice about optional choice of court agreements. The Supreme Court’s Decision # Tai-Kang 259 of 2012 plays a significant role in illustrating the methodology adopted to fill the gap of rules of international jurisdiction. The fact that Taiwanese courts prefer to characterize foreign nominated courts’ jurisdiction as optional reflects Taiwan’s judicial protectionism due to its isolation in the international arena. The forum law is applicable to the effects of the jurisdictional agreements and justifies the different treatment of optional and exclusive choice of court agreements. Section 3 deals with asymmetrical choice of court agreements. The test of their validity is whether a weaker party is unfairly impaired, rather than whether the bargaining powers are imbalanced and their standing to sue is asymmetrical. Section 4 concludes with some observations about future developments.

References

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Legislation

  1. Act Governing Relations with Hong Kong and Macau (Xiang-Gang-Ao-Men-Guan-Xi-Tiao-Li), adopted in 1997, 6146 Presidential Office Gazette (Zong-tong-fu Gong-bao) 14 (1997), and last revised in 2017, 7340 Presidential Office Gazette (Zong-tong-fu Gong-bao) 4 (2017)Google Scholar
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  3. Act on Relations between the People of the Taiwan Area and the Mainland Area (Tai-Wan-Di-Qu-Yu-Da-Lu-Di-Qu-Ren-Min-Guan-Xi-Tiao-Li), adopted in 1992, 5601 Presidential Office Gazette (Zong-tong-fu Gong-bao) 1 (1992), and last revised in 2015, 7192 Presidential Office Gazette (Zong-tong-fu Gong-bao) 11 (2015)Google Scholar
  4. Additional Articles of the ROC Constitution (Zhong-Hua-Min-Guo-Xian-Fa-Zeng-Xiu-Tiao-Wen) of 1991, 5403 Presidential Office Gazette (Zong-tong-fu Gong-bao) 2 (1991)Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Taipei University, College of LawTaipei CityTaiwan

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