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Nutritional Optimisation Through Reductions of Salt, Fat, Sugar and Nitrite Using Sensory and Consumer-Driven Techniques

  • Maurice G. O’SullivanEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter will explore the nutritional optimisation of foods using sensory and consumer-driven strategies. Examples of nutritional studies that involved the sequential reduction of salt, fat and sugar without using alternative ingredients in order to determine sensory optima but maintaining safety, functionality and adequate shelf-life are presented. Reductions in salt, fat and sugar can also be optimised by salt/fat replacer technologies and through using packaging innovations to compensate for loss of safety or shelf-life. Clean label salt and fat replacers can offer even further possibilities with respect to reduction of salt. Nitrite modification is also discussed in the context of more natural versus chemical sources as opposed to reduction per se due to concerns regarding Clostridium botulinum inhibition and safety.

Keywords

Sensory Consumer Reformulation Salt Sugar Fat Nitrite 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sensory Group, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College CorkCorkIreland

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