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Research on Robot Interaction Design Based on Embodied and Disembodied Interaction Grammars

  • Jingyan QinEmail author
  • Xinghui Lu
  • Yanlin An
  • Zeyu Hao
  • Daisong Guan
  • Moli Zhou
  • Shiyan Li
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11584)

Abstract

With the increasing complexity and variety of robotic agents in VR/AR/MR IoT and artificial intelligence and other intelligent environments, traditional interaction grammar and interaction design principles are facing more and more challenges. Based on the theory of embodied interaction and disembodied interaction in cognitive science, this paper combines field research and user in-depth interviews, usability testing, SWOT analysis, SPSS questionnaire analysis, high-fidelity prototype construction, usability testing and other research data to study the interaction grammar of embodied interaction and disembodied interaction. By designing the prototype of the robot, three typical Chinese families are selected to conduct prototype tests of embodied interaction and disembodied interaction. Then on this basis, affordance, Interactive Behavior, Interactive Feedforward of embodied interaction and Mapping Relations of Symbols, Semantics and Interactive Feedback of disembodied interaction and understanding of the construction of interactive grammar are established. This study has a certain effect on embodied interaction and disembodied interaction between human and computer interaction.

Keywords

Interactive grammar Embodied cognition Disembodied cognition Robot interaction design 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jingyan Qin
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xinghui Lu
    • 1
  • Yanlin An
    • 1
  • Zeyu Hao
    • 1
  • Daisong Guan
    • 1
  • Moli Zhou
    • 1
  • Shiyan Li
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina

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