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Genome Database (www.artichokegenome.unito.it)

  • Ezio Portis
  • Flavio Portis
  • Luisa Valente
  • Lorenzo Barchi
  • Sergio Lanteri
  • Alberto AcquadroEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Compendium of Plant Genomes book series (CPG)

Abstract

The first high-quality genome assembly of the globe artichoke has been produced within the Compositae Genome Project and the resequencing analyses of four globe artichoke genotypes, representative of the core varietal types, as well as a genotype of the related taxa cultivated cardoon was, later on, carried out. The Web site “www.artichokegenome.unito.it” hosts all the available genomic sequences, together with their structural/functional annotations and project information are presented to users via the open-source tool JBrowse, allowing the analysis of collinearity and the discovery of genomic variants, thus representing a one-stop resource for Cynara cardunculus genomics. Pseudomolecules as well as unmapped scaffolds were used for the bulk mining of SSR markers and for the construction of the first globe artichoke microsatellite marker database. A database, called “Cynara cardunculus MicroSatellite DataBase” (CyMSatDB) was developed to provide a searchable interface to the SSR data. CyMSatDB facilitates the retrieval of SSR markers, as well as suggested forward and reverse primers, on the basis of genomic location, genomic versus genic context, perfect versus imperfect repeat, motif type, motif sequence, and repeat number.

Keywords

Artichoke Cardoon Hybrids Propagation Pollination Cynara cardunculus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ezio Portis
    • 1
  • Flavio Portis
    • 2
  • Luisa Valente
    • 2
  • Lorenzo Barchi
    • 1
  • Sergio Lanteri
    • 1
  • Alberto Acquadro
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.DISAFA Plant Genetics and BreedingUniversity of TorinoGrugliasco, TorinoItaly
  2. 2.Yebokey User Experience Design and Web DevelopmentTorinoItaly

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