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AI Love You pp 133-147 | Cite as

Building Better Sex Robots: Lessons from Feminist Pornography

  • John DanaherEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

How should we react to the development of sexbot technology? Taking their cue from anti-porn feminism, several academic critics lament the development of sexbot technology, arguing that it objectifies and subordinates women, which is likely to promote misogynistic attitudes towards sex, and may need to be banned or restricted. This chapter argues for an alternative response. Taking its cue from the sex-positive ‘feminist porn’ movement, it argues that the best response to the development of ‘bad’ sexbots is to make better ones. This will require changes to the content, process and context of sexbot development. Doing so will acknowledge the valuable role that technology can play in human sexuality, and allow us to challenge gendered norms and assumptions about male and female sexual desire. This will not be a panacea to the social problems that could arise from sexbot development, but it offers a more realistic and hopeful vision for the future of this technology in a pluralistic and progressive society.

Keywords

Feminism Pornography Sexbots Objectification Commodification Subordination Anti-porn Sex-positive feminism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of Ireland (NUI)GalwayIreland

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