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The Film Festival of Independent and Underground: The Case of DOChina

  • Tit Leung Cheung
Chapter
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Part of the Framing Film Festivals book series (FFF)

Abstract

The Documentary Film Festival China (DOChina) best represents independence and the underground in China’s film scene. The diversified activities and branching projects of DOChina make it a distinctive example to illustrate the issues of an underground film scene in China. Two concepts frequently referred to in discussions of Chinese independent filmmaking, namely independence and the underground are looked at in this chapter. The context and an analysis of particular aspects of the festival, as structured in this chapter, represent the festival’s pursuit of independence in filmmaking. It is a pursuit which is motivated by ambitions towards developing Chinese independent filmmaking as a form of cultural exchange among the attending film practitioners and can be seen as a form of active political resistance. This chapter starts with a look at the origins and development of DOChina in relation to Fanhall Films and the Songzhuang District. Then I delve deep in the discussion of the concepts of ‘independence’ and ‘underground,’ as they have been articulated and contested in the Chinese festival realm. A thorough analysis of the DOChina programming policies and organisational challenges follow, first by looking at its ‘independent’ character and then at its ‘underground’ practices. Finally, I look at how the political situation forced the organisers to stop running the event.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tit Leung Cheung
    • 1
  1. 1.Hong Kong Actual Images AssociationTuen MunHong Kong

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