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Solar Systems for Urban Building Applications—Heating, Cooling, Hot Water, and Power Supply

  • Bin Li
  • Xuemei Chen
  • Xiwen Cheng
  • Xiaoqiang ZhaiEmail author
  • Xudong Zhao
Chapter
  • 602 Downloads
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

With the rapid development of urbanization, the energy consumption problem has attracted more and more attention. Solar energy, a kind of inexhaustible renewable energy, has played an important role in the energy sector. Solar energy can be used through the solar thermal transformation process and solar photovoltaic process. Then, the heat and electricity gained by those two processes can be used for many urban building applications, such as heating, cooling, hot water, and power supply. In this chapter, a detailed introduction on solar heating and cooling and domestic hot water applications for urban buildings is presented, which includes the integration of solar collectors with buildings, solar domestic hot water, space heating, and cooling applications for buildings and building-integrated photovoltaics.

Keywords

Solar collector Integration Solar photovoltaic (PV) Heating Cooling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bin Li
    • 1
  • Xuemei Chen
    • 1
  • Xiwen Cheng
    • 1
  • Xiaoqiang Zhai
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xudong Zhao
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Refrigeration and CryogenicsShanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  2. 2.School of Engineering and Computer ScienceUniversity of HullHullUK

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