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An Introduction to “Avian Genomics in Ecology and Evolution: From the Lab into the Wild”

Chapter

Abstract

Recently, the use of next-generation DNA sequencing developed from a technology that only industry could use into a common tool in nonmodel biology. Not long ago, ecologists and evolutionary biologists would rather shy away from taking on a project in which whole-genome sequencing would be the major tool. However, much sooner than anticipated, a new generation of students had been trained in the use of bioinformatics tools and concepts and they would leverage genomic technologies to their full potential—not only in medical sciences but also in ecology and evolution. Tumbling prices on the sequencing market allowed the large ornithological community to adopte this technology early. Birds can be seen as a model group among many other organismal groups. Substantial efforts of the community have built a foundation of avian genomics in ecology and evolution. In this book, we summarize the major advances that now constitute the first steps taken into making whole-genome analyses commonplace. In ten peer-reviewed chapters (in addition to this introduction) we provide an overview of the use of genome technologies in avian biology research especially for an audience that might not currently be part of the “genomics revolution.” We thereby aim to mediate between early adopters of avian genomics and interested professionals.

Keywords

Genome Birds Environment Organismal biology Non-model species Sequencing Phylogeny Speciation Conservation Dinosaurs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Migration and Immuno-EcologyMax Planck Institute for OrnithologyRadolfzellGermany
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of KonstanzKonstanzGermany

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