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Learning Inside and Between Networks: How Network Perspective Determines Research Topics and Methods

  • Ulrike CressEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series book series (CULS, volume 17)

Abstract

This chapter provides a reflection about the relation between networks, learning, and society. What does it mean if we consequently consider learning under a network approach and if we are aware that not just people constitute networks, but also knowledge artifacts and other informational resources are parts of networks. The chapter shows that schools and universities are themselves networks. They organize learning but they, at the same time, co-exist (and sometimes compete) with many other informal learning networks. Schooling, informational environments, and society cannot be treated as separate entities. Schools and universities cannot be conceptualized as closed systems. They have to be related to each other. The chapter shows – with regard to each of the 12 preceding book chapters – how this network perspective opens the learning sciences for new research topics, asks for new design requirements, and requests to expand our research methods.

Keywords

Network perspective The World Wide Web Knowledge artifacts Informational resources Formal and informal learning networks Networked society Social systems Learning in a networked society 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leibniz-Institut für WissensmedienTübingenGermany

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