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Discourses/7. New Zealand: “I Have a New Taiaha”: Learning New Ways to Advocate for the Rights of Mokopuna Māori

  • Sarah Te One
  • Marlene Welsh-Sauni
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development book series (CHILD, volume 25)

Abstract

This chapter describes the authors’ work with a uniquely Aotearoa New Zealand group, the Māori (indigenous people) Wardens. Their experiences of learning about the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UN CRC) in the context of their lived experiences of childhood is revealed based on interviews and comments shared during Child Rights and Advocacy workshops. The chapter reveals two key messages; first, that the UN CRC is not currently promulgated effectively to promote and protect children’s rights; and second, that Māori Wardens are in a unique position to advocate for the ‘hard-to-reach’ and the most disadvantaged. In their voluntary role they witness first hand, the impacts of harsh, neo-liberal economic ideology on whānau, where, as is revealed, they recognise the unrealised potential of principle articles of the UN CRC.

Notes

(i) Glossary

Aata

Practice of respectful relationships

Aotearoa NZ

The Maori name for New Zealand (NZ)

Aroha

Love, compassion and service

Hapū

Collective of related families descended from a common ancestor(s)

Iwi

Collective of hapū descended from a common ancestor (s); sometimes called a tribe

Karakia

Blessing

Kaunihera Māori

Māori Council

Kia moana

Sea food

Kōhanga Reo

Māori early childhood centre

Kōrero

Speak

Koro

Grandfather

Māori

Indigenous people of New Zealand

Marae

Traditional building used as a place for people to gather

Mihi whakatau

A welcome ceremony

Mokopuna

Progeny, children and young people

Oranga Tamariki

The Māori name for the Ministry for Children, loosely translated as children’s wellbeing

Pākehā

British, English

Poroaki

Farewell

Rangatiratanga

Autonomy, authority, self-determination

Rohe

A geographical area defined by the sovereignty of an ancestor(s)

Taiaha

Traditional spear

Tamaiti

Child

Tamariki

Children

Tangata whenua

Indigenous people, Māori

Tangata

Person/people

Taonga tuku iho

Values, traditions, treasure handed down from ancestors

Te Ao Māori

The Māori worldview

Te Puni Kōkiri

Ministry of Māori Development

Te reo Māori

The Māori language

Te Tiriti o Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi

Te Whakatakoto Tikanga

Plan, strategy

Teina

Younger sibling

Tikanga

Correct ways of doing things, protocols and rules

Tuakana

Older sibling

Tūmanako

Desire, hope

Turangawaewae

A place to stand/belong by birth right and genealogy/ancestry

Waiata

Song

Wātene

Warden of the community

Whakapapa

Genealogy

Whakawhanaungatanga

To make connections between people; building a sense of belonging and reciprocal obligations

Whānau

Family

Whānaungatanga

A process of making transparent the extended family relationships and their inherent obligations

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah Te One
    • 1
  • Marlene Welsh-Sauni
    • 2
  1. 1.CORE Education LtdChristchurchNew Zealand
  2. 2.Ngati PorouNgati WhatuaNew Zealand

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