Advertisement

An Economic Assessment of Present and Future Electronic-Waste Streams: Japan’s Experience

  • Hitoshi Hayami
  • Masao NakamuraEmail author
Chapter
  • 599 Downloads
Part of the Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World book series (ECSW, volume 33)

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss some of the most important factors, including legal, statistical, economic, and organizational factors, that affect the recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipment or more broadly the recycling of general Electronic-waste in Japan and other countries. In doing so, we emphasize the policy importance of incorporating manufacturing supply chains in the design of environmental management of production systems.

We also point out that the rates of collecting and recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment are relatively low in Japan as well as in the European Union countries. This chapter puts forward some recommendations that need to be taken into account in the public policy debate in order that the current low rates are to be improved.

References

  1. Asakura K, Hayami H, Mizoshita M, Nakano S, Nakamura M, Shinozaki M, Washizu A, Yoshioka K (2001) The input-output table for environmental analysis (Kankyo Bunsekiyo Sangyo Renkanhyo in Japanese). Keio University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  2. Baldé CP, Wang F, Kuehr R, Huisman J (2015) The global electronic waste monitor 2014: quantities, flows and resources. United Nations University, BonnGoogle Scholar
  3. Enechange (2016) Recycling costs of home appliances (in Japanese). Tokyo. https://enechange.jp/articles/kaden-rycycle-cost-list. Accessed 16 June 2018
  4. EU Eurostat (2017) Waste statistics-electrical and electronic equipment. November 2017. http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Waste_statistics_-_electrical_and_electronic_equipment. Accessed 16 June 2018
  5. Hayami H, Nakamura M (2007) Greenhouse gas emissions in Canada and Japan: sector-specific estimates and managerial and economic implications. J Environ Manag 85(2):371–392CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hayami H, Nakano S, Nakamura M, Suzuki M (2008) The input-output table for environmental analysis and applications (Kankyo Bunsekiyo Sangyo Renkanhyo to sono Oyo, in Japanese). Keio University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  7. Hayami H, Nakamura M, Nakamura A (2015) Economic performance and supply chains: the impact of upstream firms’ waste output on downstream firms’ performance in Japan. Int J Prod Econ 160:47–65CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Hotta Y, Santo A, Tasaki T (2014) EPR-based electronic home appliance recycling system under home appliance recycling act of Japan. Tokyo. https://www.oecd.org/environment/waste/EPR_Japan_HomeAppliance.pdf. Accessed 16 June 2018
  9. Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA) (2017) Shipment of cellular phones. Tokyo. https://www.jeita.or.jp/japanese/stat/cellular/2017/index.htm. Accessed 16 June 2018
  10. Japan Environmental Management Association for Industry (JEMAI) (2013, 2017) Recycle data book. Tokyo. http://www.cjc.or.jp/data/databook.html. Accessed 16 June 2018
  11. Japan Times (2015, May 9) Electronic waste recycling still falling short. TokyoGoogle Scholar
  12. Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) (2017) FY 2016 enforcement status of the home appliances recycling law and recycling statistics for manufacturers and importers. TokyoGoogle Scholar
  13. Japanese Ministry of Environment (2001) Laws: waste and recycling. Available from: http://www.env.go.jp/en/laws/recycle/06.pdf. Accessed 17 Mar 2019
  14. Japanese Ministry of Environment (2011). Eco policy and effects, (in Japanese). Available from: http://www.env.go.jp/policy/ep_kaden/pdf/effect.pdf
  15. Japanese Ministry of Environment (2012) Central environment committee 31 January 2012. Available from: http://www.env.go.jp/press/files/jp/19123.pdf. Accessed 17 Mar 2019.
  16. Japanese Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (2017) Input-output table for Japan. Tokyo. http://www.soumu.go.jp/english/dgpp_ss/data/io/index.htm. Accessed 15 Feb 2018
  17. Japanese Ministry of Justice (2017) Tokyo. http://www.japaneselawtranslation.go.jp/?re=02. Accessed 15 Feb 2018
  18. Kusch S, Hills CD (2017) The link between electronic waste and gross domestic product: new insights from data from the Pan-European region. Resources 6(2):15CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. LCA Society of Japan (JLCA) (2013) LCA database. Life Cycle Assessment Society of Japan. http://lca-forum.org/database. Accessed 16 June 2018
  20. Makela T (2009) The waste electrical and electronic equipment directive-business generation. In: Proceedings of IERC 2009, Salzburg, pp 183–190Google Scholar
  21. Mobile Recycle Network (MRN), and also Japan Environmental Management Association for Industry (JEMAI) (2018). http://www.mobile-recycle.net. Accessed 18 June 2018
  22. OKOPOL (Okopol GmbH Institute for Environmental Strategies), IIIEE (The International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics, Lund University), and RPA (Risk & Policy Analysts) (2007) The producer responsibility principle of the waste electrical and electronic equipment directive, final report. HamburgGoogle Scholar
  23. PC3R Promotion Association, Tokyo (2017). http://www.pc3r.jp. Accessed 18 June 2018
  24. Recycling Working Group, Industrial Structure Council Environment Subcommittee, Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (2007) Lowering and making transparent of the recycling prices and recycling costs (in Japanese). Tokyo. http://www.meti.go.jp/committee/gizi_1/14.html#meti0003770. Accessed 18 June 2018
  25. United Nations University and AEA Technology (2007) 2008 Review of Directive 2002/96 on Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), final report, 05 August 2007, United Nations University, BonnGoogle Scholar
  26. Yoshida F, Yoshida H (2010) Japan, the European Union, and waste electronic and electrical equipment recycling: key lessons learned. Environ Eng Sci 27(1):21–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Business and CommerceKeio UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Sauder School of BusinessUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Graduate School of Business and CommerceKeio UniversityTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations