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Mary Ward: Christian Citizen and Social Reformer

  • Helen LoaderEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

T. H. Green believed that the realisation of the moral good in the self, solely as a moral agent, would not appease the soul and that the ultimate goal of all Christian citizens must be active participation towards the common good.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for History of Women’s EducationUniversity of WinchesterWinchesterUK

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