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T. H. Green: Christianity and Moral Philosophy

  • Helen LoaderEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

T. H. Green was one of several idealists associated with Balliol College, Oxford who tried to rescue philosophy from science and foreground Christianity. One of his most famous students, Arnold Toynbee claimed that while ‘other thinkers have assailed the orthodox foundations of religion to overthrow it, Mr Green assailed them to save it.’ This chapter forms the basis of the main theoretical discussions in relation to Green’s moral philosophy that underpin the remainder of the book. Green’s ideas and concepts will be developed and expanded in the subsequent chapters in order to explore how Mary Ward interpreted, adapted and applied them as a writer and reformer in the late-Victorian and Edwardian period.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for History of Women’s EducationUniversity of WinchesterWinchesterUK

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