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Sleep and Sleep Disturbances in Climacteric Women

  • Päivi Polo-KantolaEmail author
  • Tarja Saaresranta
  • Laura Lampio
Chapter

Abstract

Climacteric is related to an increase in sleep disturbances, especially insomnia symptoms, which are linked with poorer quality of life, adverse physical and mental health, reduced productivity, and increased healthcare costs. Vasomotor symptoms are a key component of sleep disruption in climacteric, although other symptoms, like depressive symptoms, or challenges in life often contribute to sleep disorders. Findings from polysomnographic studies are less consistent in showing disrupted sleep in climacteric. Menopausal hormone therapy alleviates subjective sleep disturbances, particularly if vasomotor symptoms are present. However, due to contraindications and adverse effects, other options should also be considered; especially results from cognitive behavioral therapy are positive. Given that climacteric symptoms may persist for several years, consideration, prevention, and treatment of climacteric sleep disturbances are essential in order to ensure better health, quality of life, and work productivity in midlife women.

Keywords

Subjective sleep quality Sleep architecture Polysomnography Vasomotor symptoms Depressive symptoms Follicle-stimulating hormone Menopausal hormone therapy 

Notes

Disclosure Statement

The authors have nothing to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Päivi Polo-Kantola
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tarja Saaresranta
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Laura Lampio
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyTurku University Hospital and University of TurkuTurkuFinland
  2. 2.Sleep Research Centre, Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Clinical AllergologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland
  3. 3.Division of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary DiseasesTurku University HospitalTurkuFinland
  4. 4.Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Clinical AllergologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland
  5. 5.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyHelsinki University HospitalHelsinkiFinland

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