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Preliminary Assessment of the Structural Response of the Holy Tomb of Christ Under Static and Seismic Loading

  • Constantine C. Spyrakos
  • Charilaos A. ManiatakisEmail author
  • Antonia Moropoulou
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 961)

Abstract

The complex structure that houses the Holy Tomb of Christ, the so called Holy Aedicule, in the Most Holy Church of the Resurrection in Jerusalem has been imposed to considerable damage and structural reformations during its long history. Before the most recent rehabilitation works performed between 2016 and 2017 by the interdisciplinary team of the National Technical University of Athens, the Holy Aedicule has been reconstructed in 1810; however, no later than the first half of the 20th century, a supporting structure was placed at the monument in order to prevent it from further damage. Extensive structural and non-structural damages in recent years, have led to the urgent need for rehabilitation measures. This paper provides a first stage evaluation of the initial condition of the Holy Aedicule under static and seismic loading. This assessment is a part of the series of studies that preceded the rehabilitation works that were performed by the interdisciplinary team of the National Technical University of Athens, completed in March 2017. Based on this initial evaluation a retrofit scheme was applied in order to eliminate the weaknesses of the bearing structure.

Keywords

Holy Aedicule Holy Tomb of Christ Finite element method Structural assessment 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The study and the rehabilitation project of the Holy Aedicule became possible and were executed under the governance of His Beatitude Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theophilos III. The Common Agreement of the Status Quo Christian Communities provided the statutory framework for the execution of the project; His Paternity the Custos of the Holy Land, Archbishop Pierbattista Pizzaballa (until May 2016 – now the Apostolic Administrator of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem), Fr. Francesco Patton (from June 2016), and His Beatitude the Armenian Patriarch of Jerusalem, Nourhan Manougian, authorized His Beatitude the Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theophilos III, and NTUA to perform this research and the project. Contributions from all over the world secured the project’s funding. Worth noting Ioanna- Maria Ertegun Great Benefactor and Jack Shear Benefactor through WMF, Aegean Airlines as major transportation donor et al.

Acknowledgements are attributed to the interdisciplinary NTUA team for the Protection of Monuments, Professors Em. Korres, A. Georgopoulos, A. Moropoulou, C. Spyrakos, Ch. Mouzakis and specifically A. Moropoulou, as Chief Scientific Supervisor, of the rehabilitation project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Civil Engineering Laboratory for Earthquake EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensZografos, AthensGreece
  2. 2.School of Chemical Engineering, Section of Materials Science and EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensZografos, AthensGreece

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