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Viral Marketing

  • Jiawei Zhang
  • Philip S. Yu
Chapter

Abstract

Via the social interactions among users, information of various topics, e.g., personal interests, products, commercial services, etc. can extensively propagate throughout the networks, where lots of users can get infected and become activated. Meanwhile, the social information diffusion can bring about great commercial values, and create lots of viral marketing (Kempe et al., Maximizing the spread of influence through a social network. In KDD, 2003) opportunities. Lots of commercial companies are utilizing the information diffusion phenomenon in online social networks to promote their products or services. For instance, Apple and Huawei have been promoting their latest cell phones via Facebook and Twitter. They can provide some free cell phone samples, coupons, or even cash to certain users (with lots of followers) in Facebook, and ask them to post some good review comments or advertising photos about the cell phone. Such information will propagate to their friends and followers, who may get activated to purchase the cell phone. Commercial promotions via the online social networks have become more and more important in recent years, which even surpass the traditional print media (like newspaper, magazine, TV, and radio). At the same time, viral marketing has also become one of the most important and secure revenue sources for many online social platforms, like Facebook and Twitter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiawei Zhang
    • 1
  • Philip S. Yu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of IllinoisChicagoUSA

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