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Urban Wellbeing in the Contemporary City

  • Nimish BiloriaEmail author
  • Prasuna Reddy
  • Yuti Ariani Fatimah
  • Dhrumil Mehta
Chapter
Part of the S.M.A.R.T. Environments book series (SMARTE)

Abstract

The concept of well-being in the contemporary city refers to people’s ability to live healthy, creative and fulfilling lives. In this chapter, the intent is to understand theoretical perspectives about well-being research, essentially objective and subjective health and well-being of individuals in modern urban society. The emphasis is given to “non-medical” factors to determine the term by complex interactions between social, cultural, physical environments and individual behaviours. The chapter further indicates the tools and techniques adopted by researchers for measuring well-being emphasising the capability approach by Amartya Sen and Luc Boltanski’s approach on critical capacity. As a conclusion, based on the views and measures, the chapter suggests that addition of citizen science methodologies have potential utility for bridging objective and subjective perspectives of health and well-being, and influencing urban planning and design.

Keywords

Wellbeing Health Urban environments Measurement tools Citizen science 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nimish Biloria
    • 1
    Email author
  • Prasuna Reddy
    • 2
  • Yuti Ariani Fatimah
    • 3
  • Dhrumil Mehta
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Design Architecture BuildingUniversity of Technology SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of Science, Engineering and TechnologySwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia
  3. 3.Institute of Technology BandungBandungIndonesia

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