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The Theoretical Model of the Iranian Modern History

  • Farhad Gohardani
  • Zahra Tizro
Chapter
Part of the Political Economy of Islam book series (PEoI)

Abstract

As mentioned in the previous chapters, and following the diagnosis made by Hodgson (2002), Rodrik (2007), the World Development Reports (2005, 2015), and Easterly (2001, 2007a, b, 2014), this study aims to come up with a conceptual model uniquely tailored to the Iran-specific experiences of socio-economic development using a double-hermeneutics hybrid methodology. The main argument of this study revolves around the proposition that Iranian experience of socio-economic crises may be the outcome of the failure to produce a stable regime of truth (Foucault 1980) because of the dynamic interplay between the context of culture and the context of situation, as formulated by Malinowski (1935: 73). Foucault (1980: 93–94) makes the following ground-breaking and astonishing observation:

In the last analysis, we must produce truth as we must produce wealth, indeed we must produce truth in order to produce wealth in the first place.

In the case of Iran, the failure to produce truth seems to be at the heart of the failure to produce wealth. The failure to produce truth and wealth seems to be in turn rooted in the hyper-complex nature of the Iranian contexts. The composite notion of belated inbetweenness attempts to capture the Iran-specific nature of context of culture and context of situation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Farhad Gohardani
    • 1
  • Zahra Tizro
    • 2
  1. 1.Independent EconomistYorkUK
  2. 2.University of East London (UEL)LondonUK

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