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Surgical Ethics: Theory and Practice Background

  • Douglas BrownEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Surgical ethics has to do with the determination of what ought to be done, all things considered. This chapter prompts reflection on eight analytical questions:
  1. 1.

    What does it mean for a practicing surgeon to be “ethical”?

     
  2. 2.

    Where is “ethics” in the complexities of patient care?

     
  3. 3.

    Why do well-intentioned individuals come to conflicting judgments about what should be done?

     
  4. 4.

    What are patients and their families invited to trust?

     
  5. 5.

    When/why does trust break down in patient care?

     
  6. 6.

    When/how should patients and their families be involved in decision-making?

     
  7. 7.

    Why is it so hard to keep sense in care at life’s end?

     
  8. 8.

    Is concern for justice (ir)relevant at the bedside?

     

Keywords

Ethics Respect Values Trust Fiduciary Non-maleficence Beneficence Self-determination Justice Integrity Informed consent Goals of care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SurgeryWashington University in St. Louis School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA

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