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Mead and Blumer: Social Theory and Symbolic Interactionism

  • Woodrow W. Clark II
  • Michael Fast
Chapter
  • 217 Downloads

Abstract

The discussion of Lifeworld as an alternative in the previous chapter rises in a European context, but late in the nineteenth century, an alternative discussion as well was brought to being at the American universities, especially at the University of Chicago.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Woodrow W. Clark II
    • 1
  • Michael Fast
    • 2
  1. 1.Pepperdine Graziadio Business School, Los Angeles and MalibuCaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Business and ManagementAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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