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Clinical Assessment Tools for the Culturally Competent Treatment of Muslim Patients

  • Neil Krishan AggarwalEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past 30 years, cultural competence initiatives in mental health have evolved from a list of “dos and don’ts” based on clinician perceptions of a patient’s cultural background to ethnographic approaches that inquire about a patient’s cultural affiliations, conceptions of illness, and preferences for treatment to avoid group-level stereotypes. This chapter first reviews the rationale for cultural competence within mental health as well as cultural competence recommendations for Muslim patients. Next, it discusses the DSM-5 Outline for Cultural Formulation (OCF) and Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) as clinical assessment tools that can help clinicians ask patients about the cultural definition of the presenting problem; perceptions of cause, context, and support; self-coping and past help-seeking; and current help-seeking and treatment preferences. The OCF and CFI may help clinicians systematically and comprehensively develop diagnostic assessments and treatment plans for Muslim patients in a patient-centered way.

Keywords

Cultural psychiatry Cultural competence Islam Muslim Patient-centeredness Cultural Formulation Interview Outline for cultural formulation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA

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