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Minimally Invasive Hallux valgus Correction

  • Francesco Oliva
  • Umile Giuseppe Longo
  • Nicola MaffulliEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

There is an increasing concern among orthopaedists towards the potentials of minimally invasive procedures. Applied to foot surgery, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) can be accomplished is shorter time respect of a conventional surgery, together with less distress and problems to the soft tissues. In addition, the operation can be done bilaterally, it allows use of distal anaesthetics blocks and early weight-bearing.1

Keywords

Minimally Invasive Surgery Kirschner Wire Hallux Valgus Hallux Valgus Angle Closing Wedge Osteotomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer London 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco Oliva
  • Umile Giuseppe Longo
  • Nicola Maffulli
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Centre for Sports and Exercise MedicineQueen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End HospitalLondonUK

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