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ECG Telemetry and Long Term Electrocardiography

  • Eugene Greenstein
  • James E. Rosenthal
Chapter

Abstract

Long term electrocardiographic (LTECG) recording is a method of recording the ECG over a designated period of time. This technology allows detection of intermittent arrhythmias, ST segment changes, and repolarization abnormalities. It provides a method for determining whether periodic symptoms are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Technological advances in the past few years have provided a diversity of recording, transmitting, and analysis systems. Four general types of devices are currently available: continuous recorders, intermittent or event recorders, instruments for real-time recording and transmission of ECGs, and implantable recorders. Types of electrocardiographic recorders are shown in Table 18.1.

Keywords

Full Disclosure Pace Stimulus Tape Speed Implantable Loop Recorder Central Monitoring Station 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer London 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of CardiologyFeinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA

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