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Ureteral Physiology and Pharmacology

  • Daniel M. Kaplon
  • Stephen Y. Nakada
Chapter
Part of the Springer Specialist Surgery Series book series (SPECIALIST)

Abstract

The ureters are retroperitoneal structures responsible for urine transport between the kidneys and the bladder. They are typically 22–30 cm in length and are composed of four layers. The inner layer is transitional epithelium, over which lies the lamina propria. The lamina propria is invested with a muscle layer that is composed of inner longitudinal and outer circular muscle fibers. Overlying the muscle is the adventitia, which contains the blood vessels and lymphatics coursing with the ureter.1

Keywords

Shockwave Lithotripsy Myosin Light Chain Kinase Ureteral Obstruction Ureteral Stents Alpha Blocker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer London 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel M. Kaplon
    • 1
  • Stephen Y. Nakada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of Wisconsin Hospital and ClinicsMadisonUSA

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