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Vasodilators

  • Stephen J. Roth
  • Ricardo Munoz
  • Carol G. Schmitt
  • Eduardo da Cruz
  • Jonathan Kaufman
  • Cécile Tissot
Chapter

Pharmacological manipulation of afterload or systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has become increasingly important in the management of pediatric cardiac patients, just as it has for adult cardiac patients.

Keywords

Renal Artery Stenosis Adverse Effect Cardiovascular Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Hypertensive Emergency Contraindication Hypersensitivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. Roth
    • 1
  • Ricardo Munoz
    • 2
  • Carol G. Schmitt
    • 2
  • Eduardo da Cruz
    • 3
  • Jonathan Kaufman
    • 4
  • Cécile Tissot
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsStanford University School of MedicinePalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Critical Care Medicine, Pediatrics and SurgeryChildren's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMCPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsChildren's University Hospital of GenevaSwitzerland
  4. 4.The Heart InstituteChildren's Hospital of DenverDenverUSA
  5. 5.Pediatric Cardiology UnitUniversity Hospital of GenevaSwitzerland

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