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Inotropic and Vasoactive Drugs

  • Eduardo da Cruz
  • Peter C. Rimensberger
Chapter

Pediatric patients with congenital cardiac defects or with acquired cardiac diseases may develop cardiovascular dysfunction. In the context of cardiac surgery, the low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) probably is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the immediate postoperative phase, particularly in newborns and infants. Cardiovascular performance may also be affected in many other physiopathological circumstances, such as sepsis, endocrine, and metabolic or respiratory disorders. Regardless of the etiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in the pediatric population, medical treatment must be based on a comprehensive hemodynamic and pathophysiological appraisal7.

Keywords

Septic Shock Central Vein Adverse Effect Cardiovascular Vasoactive Drug Excessive Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eduardo da Cruz
    • 1
  • Peter C. Rimensberger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsChildren's University Hospital of GenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity Hospital of GenevaSwitzerland

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