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‘Use’ Discourses in System Development: Can Communication Be Improved?

  • Carl Martin Allwood
  • David Hakken
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Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

This paper aims to provide a basis for renewed talk about ‘use’ in computing, Four current ‘discourse arenas’ are described. Different intentions manifest in each arena are linked to failures in ‘translation’, different terminologies crossing disciplinary and national boundaries non-reflexively. Analysis of transnational use discourse dynamics shows much miscommunication. Conflicts like that between the ‘Scandinavian System Development School’ and the ‘usability approach’ have less current salience. Renewing our talk about use is essential to a participatory politics of information technology and will lead to clearer perception of the implications of letting new systems becoming primary media of social interaction.

Keywords

Computers and society Computing Information System Development International perspectives Use Users 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Martin Allwood
    • 1
  • David Hakken
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLund UniversityLundSweden
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyState University of New York Institute of Technology at Ulica/RomeUticaUSA

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