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Cognitive Technology - Technological Cognition

  • Jacob L. Mey
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads
Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

Technology, in order to be human, needs to be informed by a reflection on what it is to be a tool in ways appropriate to humans. This involves both an instrumental, appropriating aspect (‘I use this tool’) and a limiting, appropriated one (‘The tool uses me’). Cognitive Technology focuses on the ways the computer tool is used, and uses us. Using the tool on the world changes the way we think about the world, and the way the world appears to us: as an example, a simple technology (the leaf blower) and its effects on the human are discussed.

Keywords

Technology Cognition Computers Language Pragmatics Mind and Brain Tool Leaf-blower 

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References

  1. Gorayska, B. and Marsh, J. (1996). Epistemic Technology and Relevance Analysis: Rethinking Cognitive Technology. In Gorayska and Mey (eds.) Cognitive Technology: In search of a humane interface. Amsterdam/New York: North Holland/Elsevier, (Advances in Psychology, 113)Google Scholar
  2. Gorayska, B, and Mey, J. L. (1996). Of Minds and Men. In Gorayska and Mey (eds.) Cognitive Technology: In search of a humane interface. Amsterdam/New York: North Holland/Elsevier. (Advances in Psychology, 113)Google Scholar
  3. Neruda, J., (1854). Kam s ntm? Prague: Melantrich. [How to get rid of it?’]Google Scholar
  4. Salomon, G. (1992). Computers’ first decade: Golem, Camelot, or the Promised Land? Invited talk at the AERA Meeting, April 1992, San Francisco. (Draft MS)Google Scholar
  5. Simon, H. (1982). The sciences of the artificial. Cambridge. Mass.: MIT Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacob L. Mey
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Language and Communication, Odense UniversityDenmark

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