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Narration, discourse and dialogue: issues in the management of inter-cultural innovation

  • Parthasarathi Banerjee
Chapter
Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

Knowledge issues in the management of innovations are addressed properly when the importance of language and in particular of utterances are recognised. This is a new paradigm of management, named here as management by utterance. Unspoken knowledge is not communicated and unspeakable tacit knowledge cannot be of much use in such innovations. Knowledge can be uti- lised in innovations when its generation and sharing are accomplished through linguistic acts such as a narration or a drama. Discourse necessarily takes a back seat. Utterances and other linguistic forms such as narration or drama bring forth the inter-cultural issues which a manager must resolve in order that a globally diversified research, production and consumption culture remains dy- namic and innovative. These inter-cultural aspects have been detailed in this paper by a description of how European and Indian cultural stereotypes understand and appreciate the same narration or utterance. It appears that cultures differ widely in their appreciations of the same management language. Moreover, such variations belittle the discourse-based styles and emphasise the foundational aspects of global communication.

Keywords

Culture Innovation Management Tacit knowledge Utterance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Parthasarathi Banerjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Technology & Development StudiesNational Institute of SciencePusa, 110012India

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