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Surgical Instrumentation and Equipment

Chapter

Summary

Knives for soft tissues and saws for bone are the indispensable instruments for operative dismemberment. Initially borrowed from domestic and craft sources, they evolved forms specific to surgical needs, after gunshot injuries precipitated lifesaving amputation. Curved knives with concave blade edges were advised for circular amputations, giving way to straight knives with slightly convex edges for flap amputations, still a preferred procedure. Bow or frame saws, large and heavy at the beginning of the 17th century, have diminished in size ever since.Wide tenon saws displaced bow saws at the end of the 18th century in Britain, and later in America, but not in continental Europe. Equipment and instruments to control haemorrhage were stimulated by amputation procedures. Before general anaesthesia, most dismembering was undertaken with the patient seated. Assisted by anaesthesia, instruments became smaller and more accurate.

Keywords

Hole Closure Surgical Instrumentation Corrosive Sublimate Artery Forceps Digital Amputation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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