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Evidence-Based and Age-Appropriate Preventive Health Evaluations in Men

  • Raul J. SeballosEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Urology book series (CCU)

Abstract

Since 1861, the annual physical examination or preventive health evaluation (PHE) has been part of the Western culture’s practice of medicine. Its perceived value stems from the belief that it enhances good health, and the belief that the evaluation can detect subclinical illness thereby leading to improved outcomes with decreased morbidity and mortality. Recent data suggest that the PHE provides little benefit in asymptomatic adults. Some have advocated abandoning this long practice of performing the annual exam and promoting a more evidence-based or focused evaluation. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) was convened by the Public Health Service to rigorously evaluate clinical research in order to assess the merits of preventive measures, including screening tests, counseling, immunizations, and preventive medications. Their recommendations will serve as the foundation in this review of the evidence-based and age-appropriate strategies to the care of men.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Human Papilloma Virus Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Preventive MedicineWellness Institute, Cleveland ClinicClevelandUSA

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