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Hospital Infection Control: Considerations for the Management and Control of Drug-Resistant Organisms

  • Gonzalo M. L. Bearman
  • Richard P. Wenzel
Part of the Infectious Disease book series (ID)

The prevalence of nosocomially acquired, antibiotic–resistant organisms has increased signifi cantly over the last 20 years. Data from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system report published in 2000 revealed an alarming proportion of drug–resistant pathogens (1). The NNIS system data comprise a nonrandom sample of 290 hospitals from 42 states. Monthly reports of nosocomial infections and microbiology data from participating institutions are analyzed. From the sample, in 2000, 52% of all Staphylococcus aureus isolates were resistant to methicillin, 25% of enterococci were vancomycin resistant, and 88% of coagulase negative staphylococci were methicillin resistant (1). An increase in drug-resistant staphylococci and enterococci has also been reported in Europe and South America (2–4).

Keywords

Infection Control Hand Hygiene Medical Intensive Care Unit Nasal Carriage Nosocomial Pathogen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gonzalo M. L. Bearman
    • 1
  • Richard P. Wenzel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineVirginia Commonwealth University Medical CenterRichmondUSA

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