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Simultaneous Removal of Carbon and Nitrogen from Domestic Wastewater in an Aerobic RBC

  • Gupta Sudhir Kumar
  • Anushuya Ramakrishnan
  • Yung-Tse Hung
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 11)

Abstract

Carbon and nitrogen are the major pollution sources that contribute to environmental quality problems. This chapter describes sources of carbon and nitrogen in wastewaters, bioreactors for carbon and nitrogen removal, and processes for simultaneous removal of carbon and nitrogen. Application of various Rotating Biological Contactors (RBC) processes for simultaneous removal of carbon and nitrogen is discussed. Nitrification and denitrification process, and design of RBC are covered in this chapter.

Keywords

Nitrogen Removal Nitrification Rate Solid Retention Time Carbon Removal Heterotrophic Nitrification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gupta Sudhir Kumar
    • 1
  • Anushuya Ramakrishnan
    • 1
  • Yung-Tse Hung
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Environmental Science and EngineeringIndian Institute of TechnologyBombayIndia
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA

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