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Activation of the EEG

  • Barbara A. Dworetzky
  • Edward B. Bromfield
  • Nanon E. Winslow

Abstract

Various procedures are commonly used in the recording of the EEG in an effort to increase the diagnostic yield of the test. Common methods, such as hyperventilation (HV), photic stimulation, and sleep deprivation, referred to collectively as activation techniques, are traditionally used toward this end. Less common techniques, such as withdrawal of antiepileptic medications, use of specific triggers reported by the patient, and other idiosyncratic methods can be tried as well. This chapter will review methods of activation of the EEG, including HV, photic stimulation, and sleep deprivation. Historical background, physiological mechanisms, standard techniques, and clinical significance will also be reviewed.

Key Words

Hyperventilation photic stimulation photic driving photoparoxysmal response reflexepilepsy sleep deprivation 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara A. Dworetzky
    • 1
  • Edward B. Bromfield
    • 1
  • Nanon E. Winslow
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBoston

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