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Psychopharmacotherapy

  • John R. Vanin
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

History Of Anxiolytics

Early anxiolytics included alcohol, bromide preparations, paral-dehyde, barbiturates, and nonbarbiturates such as glutethimide, methaqualone, and methyprylon. Many of these antianxiety medications developed over the last century were thought to have fewer side effects than previous agents but proved to be highly addicting and fatal in overdose [1].

Chlordiazepoxide (Librium), the first benzodiazepine, was introduced in the late 1950s. Other benzodiazepine derivatives followed, including diazepam (Valium), oxazepam (Serax), cloraze-pate (Tranxene), lorazepam (Ativan), alprazolam (Xanax), and clonazepam (Klonopin).

Benzodiazepines are effective anxiolytics, widely used, and considered by many to be first-line medications for the treatment of anxiety [1,2]. Clinicians must keep in mind, however, that chronic treatment with benzodiazepines may cause psychological and physical dependence and other side effects such as sedation and psychomotor impairment [1].

Tricyclic...

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Generalize Anxiety Disorder Social Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Primary Care Practitioner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Vanin
    • 1
  1. 1.Director of Mental Health/Health EducationWest Virginia University Student Health ServiceMorgantownUSA

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