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Psychopharmacology

  • John R. Vanin
Chapter
  • 1.7k Downloads
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Psychopharmacology is defined as the science of drugs having an effect on psychomotor behavior and emotional states [1]. The primary care practitioner has an opportunity to apply skillful pharmacologic practices to safely and effectively manage patients with anxiety disorders and their coexisting problems. Having a good grasp of psychiatric principles, medicine, and pharmacology allows the primary care clinician to comfortably use the various classes of medications commonly used to treat anxiety disorders. These medications include antidepressants, which are among the most effective antianxiety agents. Most antidepressants are broadly effective for many types of disorders. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have become a mainstay for the treatment of anxiety disorders [2]. Other categories of medications for the treatment of anxiety disorders, used alone or as adjunctive therapies, include the benzodiazepines, azapirones, γ-adrenergic receptor blockers,...

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Primary Care Practitioner Minimal Effective Concentration Treat Anxiety Disorder Enzyme Tyrosine Hydroxylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Vanin
    • 1
  1. 1.West Virginia University Student Health ServiceMorgantownUSA

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