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Overview of Anxiety and the Anxiety Disorders

  • John R. Vanin
Chapter
  • 2.4k Downloads
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Anxiety can be a confusing term because it can have several different meanings and apply to different experiences and behaviors. According to Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary [1], anxiety is a vague, uneasy feeling of discomfort or dread accompanied by an autonomic (self-controlling) response. Anxiety alerts individuals to changes, both within them and in the world around them, as part of an internal signal system [2].

Anxiety consists of a range of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and is influenced by biological, psychological, and genetic factors [3]. Anxiety is a normal but at times unpleasant emotion. The subjective experience of anxiety differs, but familiar presentations include symptoms such as apprehension, uneasiness, “butterflies in the stomach,” anticipation, and dread. Objective behavioral manifestations include looking strained and tense, hypervigilance, shakiness, muscle tension, sweaty palms, rapid pulse, difficulty breathing, restlessness, and avoidance....

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Cognitive Behavior Therapy Anxiety Symptom Eating Disorder Generalize Anxiety Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Vanin
    • 1
  1. 1.West Virginia University Student Health ServiceMorgantownUSA

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