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Diuretics

Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Diuretics have appropriately maintained a stable place in the management of hypertension and heart failure (HF) because of their proven efficacy and low cost. The aldosterone antagonists spironolactone and its analog eplerenone are diuretics but have added actions that improve myocardial function and are an important part of our armamentarium for the management of patients with HF.

Keywords

Loop Diuretic Diastolic Heart Failure Ethacrynic Acid Aldosterone Antagonist Salt Substitute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

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