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Hallmark Clinical Trials

Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Results that dictate a reduction in end points observed in a few hallmark and other recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are given. The appropriate reference source is given so that the reader can explore the details of the RCT if required. Because of the constraints of available space, only a brief comment is given in the text regarding the results and their implications.

Keywords

Acute Coronary Syndrome Acute Coronary Syndrome Patient Rhythm Control Isosorbide Dinitrate Heart Outcome Prevention Evaluation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. ACUITY: Stone GW, McLaurin BT, Cox DA, et al. for the ACUITY Investigators. Bivalirudin for patients with acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med 2006;355:2203–2216.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cannon CP, Braunwald E, McCabe CH, et al. Intensive versus moderate lipid lowering with statins after acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med 2004;350:1495–1504.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. COMMIT (Clopidogrel and Metoprolol in Myocardial Infarction Trial) Collaborative Group. Early intravenous then oral metoprolol in 45,852 patients with acute myocardial infarction: Randomised placebocontrolled trial. Lancet 2005;366:1622–1632.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. COMMIT (Clopidogrel and Metoprolol in Myocardial Infarction Trial) Collaborative Group. Addition of clopidogrel to aspirin in 45,852 patients with acute myocardial infarction: Randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2005;366:1607–1621.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Davis BR, Piller LB, Cutler JA, et al. for the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) Collaborative Research Group. Role of diuretics in the prevention of heart failure: The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial. Circulation 2006;113:2201–2210.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

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