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Cardiac Arrest

Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Approximately a quarter million individuals die suddenly from cardiac arrest (C A) in the United States each year before they reach a hospital (1). It is relevant that approx 50% of patients with ventricular fibrillation (VF) survive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) versus amplt;10% for other rhythms, represented by asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA). The incidence of VF in most surveys of C A is approx 50%. Thus immediate defibrillation remains the mainstay of therapy for C A, and this concept is endorsed by the American Heart Association (AHA) 2005 guidelines (2, 3, 4).

Keywords

Cardiac Arrest Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Chest Compression Basic Life Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

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