Advertisement

Electrodiagnostic Medicine

  • Joseph Feinberg
  • Jennifer Solomon
  • Christian M. Custodio
  • Michael D. Stubblefield
Chapter

Abstract

Electrodiagnostic medicine is an extension of the patient history and physical examination. Electrodiagnostic studies (EDX) consist of two entities: (1) nerve conduction studies (NCS) and (2) needle electromyography (EMG). These studies measure the electrical properties of neuromuscular function and can be helpful in (1) confirming a suspected diagnosis, (2) excluding other possible diagnoses, (3) identifying subclinical disease processes, (4) localizing abnormalities, (5) defining disease severity, (6) defining pathophysiology, and (7) defining disease evolution and guiding prognosis and treatment options. Whereas imaging studies define anatomy, NCS and EMG define the physiology and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). This chapter is intended to provide a basic overview of electrodiagnosis, including a review of the PNS anatomy and physiology, an analysis of different wave form parameters, and a discussion of the common pathologies referred for EDX.

Keywords

Motor Unit Median Nerve Compound Muscle Action Potential Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Flexor Carpus Radialis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Key References and Suggested Additional Reading

  1. Campbell WW. AAEM Quality Assurance Committee. Literature review of the usefulness of nerve conduction studies and electromyography in the evaluation of patients with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Muscle Nerve, 1999: 22(Suppl 8): S175–S205.Google Scholar
  2. Daube JR. Clinical Neurophysiology, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
  3. Dumitru D. Electrodiagnostic Medicine, 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & Belfus, 2002.Google Scholar
  4. Ferrante MA. Electrodiagnostic approach to the patient with suspected brachial plexopathy. Neurol Clin North Am, 2002; 20:423–450Google Scholar
  5. Frontera WR. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & Belfus, 2002.Google Scholar
  6. Greenberg SA, Amato AA. EMG Pearls, 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley & Belfus, 2004.Google Scholar
  7. Katirji B. Electromyography in Clinical Practice, 1st ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, 1998.Google Scholar
  8. Wilbourn AJ. AAEM minimonograph #32: electrodiagnostic examination in patients with radiculopathies. Muscle Nerve 1998; 21:1612–1631.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Feinberg
    • 1
  • Jennifer Solomon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christian M. Custodio
    • 2
    • 3
  • Michael D. Stubblefield
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Physiatry DepartmentHospital for Special SurgeryNew York
  2. 2.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineWeill Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew York
  3. 3.Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew York

Personalised recommendations