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Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Myocardial Infarction With ST-Segment Elevation

  • Jeffrey L. Anderson
  • Sanjeev Trehan
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Heart disease continues to be the leading cause of mortality in the United States, responsible for almost 750,000 deaths a year (one-third of total deaths) (1). Two-thirds of these deaths are attributable to coronary heart disease, and half of coronary heart deaths are directly related to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), which causes a quarter of a million deaths a year. Despite the substantial remaining health challenge presented by coronary heart disease and AMI, substantial progress has been made over the past 30 years. Coronary heart disease mortality declined 58% from 1963 to 1994, and mortality from AMI has been declining more rapidly than mortality from the more chronic forms of coronary heart disease (1). AMI mortality is also generally decreasing elsewhere in the Western world, with some exceptions (2). Improvements in primary prevention, therapy, and secondary prevention are believed to have contributed approximately one-third each to this decline (3). Progress has resulted from improved understanding of AMI pathophysiology (a result of extensive basic and clinical research efforts), as well as pathophysiology-based therapies, of which the primary goal in ST-segment elevation MI is rapid reperfusion, most frequently achieved with thrombolytic therapy (4).

Keywords

Acute Myocardial Infarction Acute Myocardial Infarction Thrombolytic Therapy Patency Rate Acute Myocardial Infarction Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey L. Anderson
  • Sanjeev Trehan

There are no affiliations available

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