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Aggressive Management of Cardiogenic Shock

  • Gary E. Lane
  • David R. HolmesJr.
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

The shift in the treatment paradigm of myocardial infarction from supportive measures to an emphasis on reperfusion-based myocardial salvage has resulted in an impressive survival improvement. Despite these advances, the Worcester Heart Attack Study identified an increase in fatality rates of cardiogenic shock patients during the dynamic period of this therapeutic development (Fig. 1) (1). The mortality rates of cardiogenic shock reported from representative trials conducted over the past two decades are depicted in Figure 2 (2–4).

Keywords

Acute Myocardial Infarction Thrombolytic Therapy Cardiogenic Shock Intraaortic Balloon Cardiac Rupture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary E. Lane
  • David R. HolmesJr.

There are no affiliations available

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