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Risk Stratification: Exercise Testing, Imaging, and Cardiac Catheterization

  • Sanjeev Puri
  • Bernard R. Chaitman
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

Each year, approximately 1.5 million patients in the United States suffer an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 500,000 patients die (1). Reperfusion therapy, increased use of adjunctive medication such as aspirin, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and hypocholesterolemic treatment coupled with better risk stratification to identify those most likely to benefit from early coronary revascularization has led to significant improved long-term prognosis after myocardial infarction (MI).

Keywords

Myocardial Infarction Heart Rate Variability Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk Stratification Acute Myocardial Infarction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanjeev Puri
  • Bernard R. Chaitman

There are no affiliations available

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