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Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Therapy

  • Marc S. Sabatine
  • Ik-Kyung Jang
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

The contemporary pharmacologic treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) includes reperfusion via a thrombolytic agent as well as adjunctive therapy with aspirin and heparin (1). Despite the advances made, current management is limited by the fact that infarct-related artery patency is achieved in only 60–80% of patients at 90 min and Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow is achieved in only 30–55% of patients (2). Moreover, even after successful thrombolysis, reocclusion occurs in 5–10% of patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality (2, 3).

Keywords

Acute Myocardial Infarction Thrombin Generation Antithrombotic Therapy Direct Thrombin Inhibitor Anisoylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Activator Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc S. Sabatine
  • Ik-Kyung Jang

There are no affiliations available

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