Advertisement

Utility of Adenovirus-Based Vectors for Multiple Cancer Vaccine Approaches

  • Zachary Hartman
  • Andrea Amalfitano
Part of the Cancer Drug Discovery and Development book series (CDD&D)

Abstract

The fact that adenovirus (Ad) vectors have been utilized in over 164 clinical trials to date (at least 644 subjects) substantiates the claim that these vectors are potentially useful in a variety of gene transfer strategies (1). Ad vectors are constructed in a manner such that one can insert desired recombinant DNA sequences into the El region of the wildtype Ad genome (Fig. 1). Since the El genes only encompass a small fraction of the Ad genome, approx 90% of the wildtype Ad genome is retained in the resultant [E1-]Ad vector. For a complete review of the numerous methods to genetically engineer a firstgeneration, or [E1-]Ad-based vector, see Imperiale et al. (2). The recombinant [E1-]Ad vector genomes are introduced into human cells that express the El proteins in trans, allowing for helper virus independent [E1-]Ad vector replication and packaging, and high-level production (3).

Keywords

Human Papilloma Virus Cancer Vaccine Recombinant Adenovirus Prostate Cancer Antigen Immunotherapy Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Amalfitano A, Parks RJ. Separating fact from fiction: assessing the potential of modified adenovirus vectors for use in human gene therapy. Curr Gene Ther 2002; 2:111–133.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Imperiale MJ. Molecular biology of adenovirus gene therapy vectors. In: Cid-Arregui A and GarcíaCarrancá A, eds. Viral vectors: basic science and gene therapy. 2001:119–128.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Graham FL, Smiley J, Russell WC, Nairn R. Characteristics of a human cell line transformed by DNA from human adenovirus type 5. J Gen Virol 1977; 36:59–74.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ye XH, Gao GP, Pabin C, Raper SE, Wilson JM. Evaluating the potential of germ line transmission after intravenous administration of recombinant adenovirus in the C3h mouse. Hum Gene Ther 1998; 9:2135–2142.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gilbert SC, Schneider J, Hannan CM, Hu JT, Plebanski M, Sinden R, et al. Enhanced CD8 T cell immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a mouse malaria model using a recombinant adenoviral vaccine in heterologous prime-boost immunisation regimes. Vaccine 2002; 20:1039–1045.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gogev S, Vanderheijden N, Lemaire M, Schynts F, D’ Offay J, Deprez I, et al. Induction of protective immunity to bovine herpesvirus type 1 in cattle by intranasal administration of replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 expressing glycoprotein gC or gD. Vaccine 2002; 20:1451–1465.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shiver JW, Fu TM, Chen L, Casimiro DR, Davies ME, Evans RK, et al. Replication-incompetent adenoviral vaccine vector elicits effective anti-immunodeficiency-virus immunity. Nature 2002; 415:331–335.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Smith RR, Huebner RJ, Rowe WP, Schatten WE, Thomas LB. Studies on the use of viruses in the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. Cancer 1956; 9:1211–1218.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Zhang WW. Development and application of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of cancer. Cancer Gene Ther 1999; 6:113–138.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wu Q, Moyana T, Xiang J. Cancer gene therapy by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. Curr Gene Ther 2001; 1:101–122.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Ragot T, Finerty S, Watkins PE, Perricaudet M, Morgan AJ. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus expressing the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) envelope glycoprotein gp340/220 induces protective immunity against EBV-induced lymphomas in the cottontop tamarin. J Gen Virol 1993; 74:501–507.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chen PW, Wang M, Bronte V, Zhai YF, Rosenberg SA, Restifo NP. Therapeutic antitumor response after immunization with a recombinant adenovirus encoding a model tumor-associated antigen. J Immunol 1996; 156:224–231.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    He Z, Wlazlo AP, Kowalczyk DW, Cheng J, Xiang ZQ, Giles-Davis W, et al. Viral recombinant vaccines to the E6 and E7 antigens of HPV-16. Virology 2000; 270:146–161.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Liu DW, Tsao YP, Hsieh CH, Hsieh JT, Kung JT, Chiang CL, et al. Induction of CD8 T cells by vaccination with recombinant adenovirus expressing human papillomavirus type 16 ES gene reduces tumor growth. J Virology 2000; 74:9083–9089.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Elzey BD, Siemens DR, Ratliff TL, Lubaroff DM. Immunization with type 5 adenovirus recombinant for a tumor antigen in combination with recombinant canarypox virus (ALVAC) cytokine gene delivery induces destruction of established prostate tumors. Intl J Cancer 2001; 94:842–849.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Mincheff M, Tchakarov S, Zoubak S, Loukinov D, Botev C, Altankova I, et al. Naked DNA and adenoviral immunizations for immunotherapy of prostate cancer: a phase I/II clinical trial. Eur Urol 2000; 38:208–217.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Briones J, Timmerman J, Levy R. In vivo antitumor effect of CD4OL-transduced tumor cells as a vaccine for B-cell lymphoma. Cancer Res 2002; 62:3195–3199.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Armstrong AC, Dermime S, Allinson CG, Bhattacharyya T, Mulryan K, Gonzalez KR, et al. Immunization with a recombinant adenovirus encoding a lymphoma idiotype: induction of tumor-protective immunity and identification of an idiotype-specific T cell epitope. J Immunol 2002; 168:3983–3991.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Wong CP, Levy R. Recombinant adenovirus vaccine encoding a chimeric T-cell antigen receptor induces protective immunity against a T-cell lymphoma. Cancer Res 2000; 60:2689–2695.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Caspar CB, Levy S, Levy R. Idiotype vaccines for non-Hodgkin’ s lymphoma induce polyclonal immune responses that cover mutated tumor idiotypes: comparison of different vaccine formulations. Blood 1997; 90:3699–3706.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Basak S, Eck S, Gutzmer R, Smith AJ, Birebent B, Purev E, et al. Colorectal cancer vaccines: antiidiotypic antibody, recombinant protein, and viral vector. Ann NY Acad Sci 2000; 910:237–252.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Li W, Berencsi K, Basak S, Somasundaram R, Ricciardi RP, Gonczol E, et al. Human colorectal cancer (CRC) antigen C017–1A/GA733 encoded by adenovirus inhibits growth of established CRC cells in mice. J Immunol 1997; 159:763–769.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Steitz J, Bruck J, Steinbrink K, Enk A, Knop J, Tuting T. Genetic immunization of mice with human tyrosinase-related protein 2: implications for the immunotherapy of melanoma. Intl J Cancer 2000; 86:89–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Zhai Y, Yang JC, Kawakami Y, Spiess P, Wadsworth SC, Cardoza LM, et al. Antigen-specific tumor vaccines. Development and characterization of recombinant adenoviruses encoding MARTI or gp1000 for cancer therapy. J Immunol 1996; 156:700–710.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Rosenberg SA, Zhai Y, Yang JC, Schwartzentruber DJ, Hwu P, Marincola FM, et al. Immunizing patients with metastatic melanoma using recombinant adenoviruses encoding MART-1 or gp100 melanoma antigens. J Natl Cancer Inst 1998; 90:1894–1900.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Hirschowitz EA, Weaver JD, Hidalgo GE, Doherty DE. Murine dendritic cells infected with adenovirus vectors show signs of activation. Gene Ther 2000; 7:1112–1120.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Arthur JF, Butterfield LH, Roth MD, Bui LA, Kiertscher SM, Lau R, et al. A comparison of gene transfer methods in human dendritic cells. Cancer Gene Ther 1997; 4:17–25.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Diao J, Smythe JA, Smyth C, Rowe PB, Alexander IE. Human PBMC-derived dendritic cells transduced with an adenovirus vector induce cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses against a vector-encoded antigen in vitro. Gene Ther 1999; 6:845–853.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Brossart P, Goldrath AW, Butz EA, Martin S, Bevan MJ. Virus-mediated delivery of antigenic epitopes into dendritic cells as a means to induce CTL. J Immunol 1997; 158:3270–3276.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Butterfield LH, Jilani SM, Chakraborty NG, Bui LA, Ribas A, Dissette VB, et al. Generation of melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by dendritic cells transduced with a MART-1 adenovirus. J Immunol 1998; 161:5607–5613.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Bregni M, Shammah S, Malaffo F, Dinicola M, Milanesi M, Magni M, et al. Adenovirus vectors for gene transduction into mobilized blood CD34(+) cells. Gene Ther 1998; 5:465–472.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Diao J, Smythe JA, Smyth C, Rowe PB, Alexander IE. Human PBMC-derived dendritic cells transduced with an adenovirus vectorinduce cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses against a vector-encoded antigen in vitro. Gene Ther 1999; 6:845–853.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Dietz AB, Vuk-Pavlovic S. High efficiency adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to human dendritic cells. Blood 1998; 91:392–398.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Ishida T, Chada S, Stipanov M, Nadaf S, Ciernik FI, Gabrilovich DI, et al. Dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53 gene elicit potent anti-tumour immune responses. Clin Exp Immunol 2000; 117: 244–251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Ribas A, Butterfield LH, Mcbride WH, Jilani SM, Bui LA, Vollmer CM, et al. Genetic immunization for the melanoma antigen MART-1/Melan-A using recombinant adenovirus-transduced murine dendritic cells. Cancer Res 1997; 57:2865–2869.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Wan Y, Emtage P, Foley R, Carter R, Gauldie J. Murine dendritic cells transduced with an adenoviral vector expressing a defined tumor antigen can overcome anti-adenovirus neutralizing immunity and induce effective tumor regression. Intl J Oncol 1999; 14:771–776.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Wan Y, Bramson J, Carter R, Graham F, Gauldie J. Dendritic cells transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding a model tumor-associated antigen for tumor vaccination. Hum Gene Ther 1997; 8:1355–1363.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    Miller PW, Sharma S, Stolina M, Butterfield LH, Luo J, Lin Y, et al. Intratumoral administration of adenoviral interleukin 7 gene-modified dendritic cells augments specific antitumor immunity and achieves tumor eradication. Hum Gene Ther 2000; 11:53–65.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Rea D, Schagen FHE, Hoeben RC, Mehtali M, Havenga MJE, Toes REM, et al. Adenoviruses activate human dendritic cells without polarization toward a T-helper type 1-inducing subset. J Virol 2000; 73:10245–10253.Google Scholar
  40. • 40. Morelli AE, Larregina AT, Ganster RW, Zahorchak AF, Plowey JM, Takayama T, et al. Recombinant adenovirus induces maturation of dendritic cells via an NF-kappaB-dependent pathway. J Virol 2000; 74:9617–9628.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Hirschowitz EA, Weaver JD, Hidalgo GE, Doherty DE. Murine dendritic cells infected with adenovirus vectors show signs of activation. Gene Ther 2000; 7:1112–1120.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Jonuleit H, Tuting T, Steitz J, Bruck J, Giesecke A, Steinbrink K, et al. Efficient transduction of mature CD83+ dendritic cells using recombinant adenovirus suppressed T cell stimulatory capacity. Gene Ther 2000; 7:249–254.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Alemany R, Ruan S, Kataoka M, Koch PE, Mukhopadhyay T, Cristiano RJ, et al. Growth inhibitory effect of anti-K-ras adenovirus on lung cancer cells. Cancer Gene Ther 1996; 3:296–301.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Ribas A, Butterfield LH, Mcbride WH, Jilani SM, Bui LA, Vollmer CM, et al. Genetic immunization for the melanoma antigen mart- l/melan-a using recombinant adenovirus-transduced murine dendritic cells. Cancer Res 1997; 57:2865–2869.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Wan YH, Bramson J, Carter R, Graham F, Gauldie J. Dendritic cells transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding a model tumor-associated antigen for tumor vaccination. Hum Gene Ther 1997; 8:1355–1363.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Wan YH, Emtage P, Foley R, Carter R, Gauldie J. Murine dendritic cells transduced with an adenoviral vector expressing a defined tumor antigen can overcome anti-adenovirus neutralizing immunity and induce effective tumor regression. Intl J Oncol 1999; 14:771–776.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    He TC, Zhou S, da Costa LT, Yu J, Kinzler KW, Vogelstein B. A simplified system for generating recombinant adenoviruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998; 95:2509–2514.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Hartman
  • Andrea Amalfitano

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations