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Nerve Agents

  • Jonathan Newmark
Chapter

Abstract

The organophosphonate nerve agents are the deadliest of the classical chemical warfare agents. They have been used on the battlefield and also in two terrorist attacks. Since excellent antidotal therapy for these agents exists, and since it must be applied rapidly in order to save patients, physicians must familiarize themselves with the appropriate pathophysiology and the rationale for these antidotes.

Keywords

Status Epilepticus Nerve Agent Cholinergic Synapse Pyridostigmine Bromide Chemical Weapon Convention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Newmark

There are no affiliations available

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