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Breast Cancer pp 145-159 | Cite as

Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer

  • Michael P. Russin
  • Lori J. Goldstein
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Oncology book series (CCO)

Abstract

At the time of diagnosis, breast cancer is generally thought of as a systemic disease. For many years, chemotherapy has been considered one of the cornerstones of treatment and has evolved over the past 20 years. Chemotherapy has shown benefit in both early and advanced disease. The decision of when to administer cytotoxic therapy and which agents to utilize is often a complex and challenging dilemma for clinicians and their patients.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Metastatic Breast Cancer Advanced Breast Cancer Primary Breast Cancer National Comprehensive Cancer Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael P. Russin
  • Lori J. Goldstein

There are no affiliations available

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