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Quinolones

  • David R. P. Guay
Part of the Infectious Disease book series (ID)

Abstract

Drug—drug interactions can be categorized into those originating from pharmacokinetic mechanisms and those originating from pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Pharmacokinetic interactions are those that result in alterations of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination, whereas pharmacodynamic interactions occur when one drug affects the actions of another drug. This chapter will deal only with fluoroquinolone (hereafter referred to as quinolone) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions with nonantimicrobial agents. Additive, synergistic, or antagonistic antimicrobial activity interactions between quinolones and other antimicrobials will not be discussed.

Keywords

Antimicrob Agent Enteral Feeding Pharmacokinetic Interaction Hepatic Drug Metabolism Theophylline Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. P. Guay

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