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Drug Interactions with Antiretrovirals for HIV Infection

  • Stephen C. Piscitelli
  • Kimberly A. Struble
Part of the Infectious Disease book series (ID)

Abstract

In no other specialty of infectious diseases do drug interactions play such a critical role in patient care as they do for HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection, especially those with late-stage disease, often receive numerous medications and up to 40 pills or more each day. In addition to at least three antiretrovirals, patients may also be taking drugs for opportunistic infections, concurrent diseases, symptomatic relief, and supportive care. Management of these complex regimens can be overwhelming for the clinician.

Keywords

Opportunistic Infection Grapefruit Juice Empty Stomach Ethinyl Estradiol 39th Interscience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen C. Piscitelli
  • Kimberly A. Struble

There are no affiliations available

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